CLINICAL RESEARCH
Does contrast media volume affect long-term survival in patients with chronic kidney disease?
 
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Submission date: 2017-09-24
Final revision date: 2017-10-01
Acceptance date: 2017-10-10
Publication date: 2017-11-09
 
Arch Med Sci Atheroscler Dis 2017;2(1):82–89
 
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Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between survival and related features in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing cardiac catheterization and coronary angiography.
Material and methods: Three hundred and seven consecutive patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 undergoing coronary angiography were enrolled in the study. The study population was pursued with a median follow-up duration of 41.5 months.
Results: In the Cox proportional hazards regression model, age (HR = 1.047, 95% CI: 1.011–1.084, p = 0.01), contrast media volume (HR = 1.004, 95% CI: 1.001–1.007, p = 0.008), angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) use (HR = 0.485, 95% CI: 0.261–0.901, p = 0.02), and e-GFR (HR = 0.978, 95% CI: 0.940–1.016, p = 0.04) were found to be independent predictors of long-term all-cause mortality. The survival analysis showed that the long-term all-cause mortality rate was higher in patients using contrast media volume greater than 140 ml compared to patients given less than or equal to 140 ml during the coronary angiography (3.6% vs. 11.6% log-rank, p = 0.001).
Conclusions: In patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing cardiac catheterization, age, contrast media volume, e-GFR and low ARB use were found to be independent predictors of long-term all-cause mortality. Contrast media volume used > 140 ml was independently associated with long-term all-cause mortality compared to less than or equal to 140 ml during cardiac catheterization.
ISSN:2451-0629