CLINICAL RESEARCH
Evaluation of serum endocan levels in relation to epicardial fat tissue thickness in metabolic syndrome patients
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Department of Internal Medicine, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul Kartal Dr Lutfi Kirdar Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
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Department of Internal Medicine, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul GOP Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
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Department of Internal Medicine, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul Fatih Sultan Mehmet Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
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Department of Cardiology, University of Health Sciences, Mehmet Akif Ersoy Education and Research, Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
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Department of Biochemistry, Namik Kemal University Faculty of Medicine, Tekirdag, Turkey
Submission date: 2020-06-16
Final revision date: 2020-10-08
Acceptance date: 2020-11-02
Publication date: 2020-12-26
 
Arch Med Sci Atheroscler Dis 2020;5(1):290–296
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Metabolic syndrome has been recognized as a predictor of cardiovascular diseases. Epicardial fat tissue (EFT) thickness has recently been shown to be a predictor of cardiovascular diseases in metabolic syndrome patients. Endocan is a novel molecule which is considered to be an early marker of endothelial dysfunction. Our aim was to evaluate endocan serum levels for the first time in metabolic syndrome patients, in relation to EFT thickness.

Material and methods:
The study included 44 patients with metabolic syndrome who had neither chronic kidney disease nor chronic inflammation and 26 healthy controls. Fasting blood samples were obtained from the groups. The serum levels of endocan were measured with a Sunred ELISA kit. EFT thickness of patients was measured by echocardiography.

Results:
The serum endocan levels were significantly lower in the metabolic syndrome patients compared to the healthy controls (120.71 ±90.17 pg/ml vs. 414.59 ±277.57, p < 0.001). Metabolic syndrome patients demonstrated significantly higher EFT (p = 0.042). EFT thickness had a positive correlation with age (r = 0.397, p = 0.008) and weight (r = 0.010). However, there was no correlation with serum endocan (r = –0.021, p = 0.893) or other parameters. Regression analysis revealed that waist circumference is the parameter among metabolic syndrome criteria having the strongest relationship with serum endocan levels ( = –0.499, p = 0.21).

Conclusions:
EFT thickness was high in metabolic syndrome patients and can be a useful marker for cardiovascular risk assessment. However, serum endocan levels were found to be low and there was no correlation with EFT thickness. Large sample sized prospective studies are needed to clarify the relation of endocan levels with the other clinical indicators of cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome.

ISSN:2451-0629